Executive Spotlight Series: The Why Behind Charles Boicey

Larry Kaiser

Clearsense's Executive Spotlight Series

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Charles Boicey, MS, RN-BC, PMP, CPHIMS

Chief Innovation Officer, Clearsense, LLC.

Welcome to Clearsense’s “Executive Spotlight” series, where we interview the executives of Clearsense, bringing a face to the name.

In this installment, we will talk with Charles Boicey, MS, RN-BC, PMP, CPHIMS. Boicey sits as the Chief Innovation Officer for Clearsense, LLC. Boicey is known as a notable expert clinical information systems specialist offering 25-plus years of strategic leadership. Starting his career as a bedside trauma nurse, he began to witness many gaps in medical technology. Thus beginning his life’s work journey.

QUESTION: What prompted the passion behind devoting your life’s work to clinical informatics?

Charles Boicey: I began my career as a trauma nurse at LA County, USC Medical Center working bedside. LA County is a level one trauma center. We saw just about every variety of patient through our doors. This gave me firsthand experience as to how crucial each minute is for the patient’s full recovery. As my career path took shape I began to spend a lot of time with medical devices and medical information systems. I was always on the clinical side of the healthcare industry, and this led me to realize that the medical field was underutilizing clinical informatics to help saves patient lives.

QUESTION: Why did you continue on this path to pioneer such a technology through Clearsense?

Charles Boicey: In the late 80s, early 90s I had the pleasure to work alongside William C. Shoemaker, M.D., MCCM. Dr. Shoemaker is one of the founding fathers of the Society of Critical Care Medicine Dr. Shoemaker’s approach, founded on impeccable scientific and clinical credentials, led to his assuming the role of Founding Editor-in-Chief of the journal Critical Care Medicine, now one of (if not the leading) international publication in the specialty. We developed predictive models for active trauma patients. They were accurate and helpful to patient care, however, we did not have the infrastructure to deploy the said model. That fact bothered me. Our models could save lives if we could translate them into the workflow within hospitals. The technology and the marketplace were not ready yet. Clinicians were not inclined to have a machine dictate how they went about medicine. Having the privilege to simply be a sponge for the brilliant mind of Dr. Shoemaker encouraged my passion for clinical care data analytics.

That fact bothered me. Our models could save lives if we could translate them into the workflow within hospitals. The technology and the marketplace were not ready yet. Clinicians were not inclined to have a machine dictate how they went about medicine.

QUESTION: Going back to the “why.” Why is ingesting all data elements in their natural state, leaving no data behind such an important tool for healthcare?

Charles Boicey: Following up on the models created with Dr. Shoemaker I deepened my understanding of just how beneficial complete healthcare data could be for a clinician. Data archiving allows health care providers store patient records for years, as state and federal laws require. This would allow for fewer patients deteriorating if we had the data in hand to predict and possibly prevent a medical condition.

QUESTION: What experience did you bring to Clearsense to be able to develop such a technology?

Charles Boicey: Following about 12 years working in the field of nursing, the scholastic world peaked my interest. I worked for City of Hope, the University of California Irvine and the University of California Riverside. From there I ventured to Stonybrook Medicine out of Long Island. These institutions helped to develop my role as a Clinical Informatics Enterprise Analytics Architect.